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children's future brighter, we will invest in our education system. from before they enter kindergarten to the time they leave higher education, we must prepare them to succeed in a 21st century economy. and if we are sincere in our concern for the next generation, how we deal with one another matters, not only during this session but also throughout the campaigns that bring us to these positions of public trust. every day, our kids watch what we do and learn from our example. members of the 63rd legislature, what i ask of you tonight is simple and straightforward: first, be responsible with our budget, because i won't allow you to spend more than we take in or make cuts that undermine our long-term stability. second, join me in focusing on creating jobs, investing in education, and making government more effective, and lastly, act in a manner that we're not ashamed to have our children watching, because they are. i am taking these principles to heart, and we've hit the ground running to create better jobs, better schools and a more effective government. a company recently came to the s
of this increase. my commitment to k-12 education has also increased spending for our schools. but we must only allow for growth that our fragile economic recovery can bear. in this budget we've reduced the tax burden on local businesses, we've addressed increasing caseloads, and we've begun to diversify our economy. the social service net is stronger. support for education is increased. and nevadans will continue to benefit from the overarching policy of this administration throughout this economic down turn. that is, we cannot cut our way out, we cannot tax our way out, we can only grow our way out. [applause] as nevada prepares to celebrate 150 years of statehood, we must also consider how far we have come and prepare for what lies ahead. 2014 is not just the anniversary of nevada's statehood. it also marks the centennial year of the approval of women's suffrage in our state. nevada gave women the right to vote in 1914, five years before the rest of the nation adopted the 19th amendment in 1919. [applause] it is my hope that the celebration of women's suffrage and the commemoration of nevada
a deal with the college democrats but those of us thought are not involved in the politics and education or finance or any other topic and a lot of people but are not in the politics don't know what to do and they believe they see the problems in front of us and they understand and comprehend how serious they are and they want to do something that they either do not know how to or they are intimidated. but from my experience they are ready to believe again and they can hope again and as our national leader continuance buyer and hope my generation the people that are older than me so once again stand out and fight for what they believe. >> it's how you teach an old dog new tricks. >> most of us are in our environment how we were raised, and we learn from them. i have said there's five promises every adult should make. the first is a child should have a loving and caring adults in their life and the second is they should have a healthy start to read the child should have an education. the child should have a safe place. the second one is a promise you cannot teach. they should grow to be l
of education. last year the house passed a bill to allow governors the appointment of superintendent. i cannot state how important this change is. all we are asking is that we give the voters the opportunity at the ballot box to make this constitutional change. the south carolina house of representatives report -- of representatives supports it. let us give them that opportunity. they deserve it. [applause] now to the department of administration. each of the last two years i have made the argument of ridding our state of the big green monster that is the budget control board. some of you have made that argument with me. for me to do so again tonight would be redundant. i believe most of you know that it is the right thing to do. instead i will make this observation -- if one came to south carolina from another state or country and saw the way the department of administration bill was handled last year, he or she would surely be confused. the senate unanimously voted in favor of it, a large majority in the house voted for it, and it still did not pass? how is that possible? how did the senate
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
will discuss a national school choice week and the education options available to students across the country. first, we want about what's coming up on c-span2 and c- span3. 3's an2's booktv and c-span american history take -- american history tv ticket to santa fe, new mexico. that is coming up at noon -- a visit to local literary landmarks, interviews with authors from the area. here is a clip from santa fe writer james morris as he talks about joseph pulitzer and his book. >> i am james mcgrath morris. behind me stand some early printing presses. this seemed like a perfect place to talk about the man who revolutionized american newspapers. what i for started working on the book, people would react with recognition when i was writing about joseph pulitzer. it was clear from their expressions of anger about the name and not anything about his life. he shares his fate with alfred nobel, which is being well known for prize, but not well known for what he did in his life. alfred nobel was an explosive munitions maker. few people understand the significant role joseph pulitzer played in american
working meals not social occasions winston churchill loved them. he used the hour the sphoant educate others about the policy to persuade them to go along and learn from the guests the latest and political social goes gossip and get news from around the world. there was no 24-news cycle in those dais. private reports of well-placed guests were often the best source of what was going on in se the soviet union. his guests came from all walks of life both during the war they were mainly military and politicians british and american. and when winston churchill felt he could tolerate it he had to dine with charles. but there was always a purpose to the dinners toed a van his country's interest to explain, cajole, to learn, to exchange information, it was the conversation that mattered. the setting the table and the food were the stage which he would perform. here are two examples examples with important dib -- inners. white house in december of 1911 and a second one in 1942 when winston churchill after the grueling and dangerous flights to avoid german fighters in the air flew to moscow to
. there are places where we don't have market mechanisms. in health care and education, as we've gotten rich, those are bigger parts of the economy and our ability to use normal, private sector things to work in those areas is very, very weak. 95% of teachers are never given any feedback. never told, hey, you do this well, but you should work on this. go over and see how some other teacher calms the classroom down or makes a complex subject interesting. and i think if we bring feedback systems, which means measuring and telling people how they're doing, we bring that into areas like teaching, we can get more out of the education investments that we make. >> but you think that because of technology and that kind of thing, americans today have many more opportunities in some sense than they had before? >> that's right. if you take median income and that means we haven't had this big improvement. >> which hasn't changed in the last 25 years. >> that really understates what's happened. i mean, would you rather be a gay man 20 years ago, 50 years ago? in africa and gdp didn't go up, but life spans almos
these kids taking part-time jobs, jobs that don't require a college education and they're being sidelined in the service industry. they're losing that first rung on the ladder. is it the lost generation? >> it's actually worse than that. it is we who have failed them. we have failed them. as you look around, the whole debate after the election has not been jobs. during the campaign it was jobs, jobs, jobs but now it's gun safety. a very important issue. >> yeah. >> getting out of afghanistan, an important issue. it's immigration, an important issue. but jobs is a critical issue. and the numbers we saw this week -- yeah, they're a little better. but the bottom line is that if they continue at that rate it's going to take us seven years for us to get to prerecession job numbers. seven years. and so i really think that we can't just sit idly by the sidelines. >> what should we do? >> i really think what's happening, you see young people themselves trying to create jobs themselves, start-ups. we launched a prize competition called job raising. $250,000. and different non-for-profits competing
because she wanted an education. >> abc's bob woodruff spoke to the girl's father about her surgeries and the challenges that lie ahead. >> reporter: malala's journey from this to this is nothing short of a miracle. and for the first time, people heard her voice. >> today, you can see that i'm alive. i can speak. i can see you. i can see everyone. and i'm getting better day by day. it's just because of the prayers of people. >> reporter: prayers and letters sent to this young girl who became a symbol of hope. she was just 12 when the taliban shut down her school. the public crusade began. >> i have the right of education. i have the right to play. i have the right to sing. i have the right to talk. i have the right to speak. >> reporter: her actions made her a target. last october, on her way home from school, she was brutally attacked. gunmen entered her van and shot her at point-blank range in the head. she was medevaced to england in critical condition. but she refused to die. the bullet glanced off her skull, traveled down her cheek and into her shoulder. incredibly, it didn't ent
of the battle for talent and our insane policy in this country of educating individuals that have great talent and intellect and then telling them they have no opportunity to pursue careers in the united states. also to recognize that many first-reneurs, are generation americans or early arrivals in our country. there are visa provisions that allow for an increase in the number of stem visas but also for those that are foreign born but that one to create business and the united states. in addition to that, we believe that having some competition among states through information and knowledge will increase the opportunity for entrepreneurs to decide where they can start with a new idea and beginning company. -- begin a company. i hope what we learn from a community's efforts in regard to sopa and pipa with a demonstrated they have the ability to stop legislation, i would love to see the circumstance in which they have the ability to promote legislation to see that in his past. we are taking the approach that this legislation is not perfect. seeking input from you and others, i have been to sout
to educate members and then get them to listen to their constituents and give us feedback as to what we can do that will work and that will be something acceptable to the public. lou: mr. chairman, may i congratulate you? you have just become the first congressman or senator with whom i have spoken on this issue of the course of the past decade to say that he did not want to go out to educate the american people but rather to educate congress and go out to the american people to hear their views, concerns, thoughts, and ideas. naturally, sincerely company you for that and i think that is such a critically important perspective of our nation's leader. >> we have representative democracy, and a lot of people overlook that when they look to a congress to rush in to solve a problem, * we russian -- we had to push past something that does not solve the problem or did it builds up to a large piece of legislation and then it collapses as immigration reform it in the senate a few years ago neither of those approaches is good. i think the approach of looking at each aspect of this program and trying
or opportunities? with an advanced degree in education from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to meet these challenges and make a difference in the lives of students. let's get started at capella.edu. >>> even as it seems that many republican politicians are johnny come latelies to the issue of immigration reform, there are conservative advocates on this issue for some time and most notably former governor of florida jeb bush has been pushing the party to more warmly embrace the latino electorate. next month, former governor bush and his partner at the goldwater institute will release their book "immigration wars, forging an american solution" and last week they penned an op-ed in the "wall street journal," that in some conservative circles the word comprehensive immigration reform is an epithet-a code word for amnesty. people who have such declaration s when associated with the border states are moving toward something more. go and now the author is joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> you have said that the legislation act since 1952 has not held up well and in short, we need
with our parents and share what our children are learning. >> she represents a new generation of educators that values social media. anne arundel county is about to get on board systemwide. they are drawing up a social media policy to enhance education and learning. >> we will use social media for instructional purposes. if the teacher finds a youtube video, we could unblock youtube. they could use it in the lesson. they currently cannot do that. >> educators will create a high- tech path for learning. social media has already gotten a past. >> i see so many opportunities to connect with classrooms across the country and the world. if opens up so many doors for my students. >> these social media policy will not go on the books without language to protect students. it will draw the line on how students and educators communicate, but they're also be exceptions in cases where administrators and parents have given written permission. this is the first reading of the social media policy. if approved by the school board, it would go on the books this fall. we have a draft of that proposal on our
for failed education systems, failed school systems to get their acts together. throughout the country there are some promising signs that we can bring schools and parents together to improve our educational system. san francisco public schools adopted a funding mechanism according to what's termed a weighted student formula. under this policy the more students a school attracts, the more money that school, its administrators and teachers receive. low-income students are weighted heavier and the funding forum as our children with disabilities, and those learning english as a second language. so there's incentives are schools to seek the more vulnerable population, and reasons for schools to differentiate themselves and to excel. imagine if we were to try and move in this direction with federal funding. allow the money we truly spend to actually follow individual children. students, including those without a lot of money for those with special needs, we be able to access a school which would give them a shot at having a successful life, a shot at earning their success and achieving thei
three, and critically important as education and guidance. more than ever workers are responsible for saving and planning for their retirement. they need help understanding a range of financial topics from the most basic information about how to enroll and how much they should save to the more complex topics such as proper asset allocation and in come planning. workers had received guidance take action and have better outcomes. our data shows that workers who engage in a retirement planning session as and nexium pulled either online or on the phone increase their deferral rates on average by five to six percentage points. one thing that is constant in all of our research is that a majority of workers want and need help. workers also need a simple way to gauge their savings process. last fall fidelity released new research on age based savings guidelines. these guidelines serve as a framework for establishing the retirement savings goals as workers progress through their careers, their salary, time a factor of x can be one of the measures used to assess the retirement savings progr
'll advance proposals aimed at producing results in areas like education, health health, innovation, and job growth. our solutions will be based on the conservative principles of self-reliance, faith in the individual, trust in family, and accountability in government. our goal is to ensure that every american has a fair shot to earn success and achieve their dreams. it's my hope that i can stand before you two years from now and report you that our side, as well as the president's, found within us the ability to set differences aside in order to provide relief to so many millions of americans who just want their life to work again. in so many countries in history, children were largely confined to the same station in life as their parents, but not here. because here we've seen the son of a shoe man become the president of the united states. we have seen a daughter of a poor single mom develop and build a company that turned into her being the oregon of a tv network. in america, the grandson of poor immigrants, who fled russia, come here, and that grandson became the majority leader of the h
budget is up to 20% and the next decade is 30% of our budget. it takes away from education, infrastructure, other health and human service needs. so medicaid and the need to have flexibility is something we are go to go watch as we go forward. let me finish where i started. we need to address the rising costs of health care. i don't think the affordable care act does that. we have provided an opportunity with our health care exchange in utah is a model based on good principles that allows businesses to provide as a benefit and health with competitive forces and consumer control to, in fact, have an impact on the rising costs of health care. it may be imperfect, but it's a step in the right direction. again, the fundamental position i'm taking and we're taking in utah is that the free market works if you allow it. and takes politicians like myself and others to be disciplined and to give time for the marketplace to work. we sometimes are so anxious to fix the problem, that we don't let the marketplace make the adjustments necessary to get the right outcome. and again as i sa
'm investing in education. personally, and with all of my administration, i personally adopted the 12 middle schools in this city to make sure that the truancy goes down, is not eliminated, that the kids who are in our middle schools have the hope, the hope that we're generating when they were in elementary school, involved with their parents, have the same kind of guidance and support as they get to critical decisionses about whether or not they see the vision of living in the city and going to college and getting the kind of education and skill sets to take on these great jobs that we're creating. i want to make sure -- yes. (applause) >> i want to make sure that our tech sf are training programs rhonda is heading up and so many others create the foundation at the skill sets to earn these new jobs. it's ecology jobs that we all see happening that pay very good salaries, that we're training people in bayview, in the western addition, in all of our city to make sure they have not only the good shots that they get those jobs as well. and that's why it's so important that all the companies in
in the conversation with digital media or literacy needed within the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a huge impact in regards to bullying or electronic aggression or whatever name we want to place on it and is affecting the students and i am excited you're addressing this issue and it's a crucial time for this generation and if we don't take serious this conversation today and action tomorrow we will see more and more issues arise. [applause] >> and i'm going to cap it up and i totally agree with that and one of the resources i want you to point is out is the family institute on line and platform for good
are part of the solution. in that effort both in advocacy we have a strong, strong goal of educating our public and all the other kids and families in our city. this is a way of our quality of life, we cannot accept human trafficking. part of the way to do that is to have this be part of the kids education, and push strongly. the collaborative this year, allow the youth of san francisco to enter in a poster contest to provide artistic ability to the messaging of this really important movement. the 2013 poster contest winners i get to announce. i will begin with third-place winners. the third-place winner, first one eighth-grade student, from james brannan middle school. shelley lu (sounds like) apl(applause) also an eighth-grade student from james dunham as well, stella lee. thank you. apl(applause) (applause) to be an eighth-grader. the collaborative has chosen for the second place at 12 greater, from abraham lincoln high school. stephanie chung (applause) and then we have a number of first place winners. i'm sure this is all about collaboration, talking about it, what it means
is that within the education budget we have prioritized the per pupil funding so that has been a reduction in per pupil funding because i think it's very important schools can see forward to future years, the source -- a source of budget they will have. the second thing we've done is obviously for the academy program is to encourage the devolution of more of the schools budget to the schools directly and i still think there's more that we can achieve on that agenda. >> mr. speaker, the prime minister said he would give the public a strong voice in the nhs. his former health secretary said he would have since of the nhs. why then -- [inaudible] rejected by the government last night? >> we do want to see patients have a stronger voice in the nhs and we are about to debate i think at some length some terms of the staff how that is done. i think one of the most important ways is going to be making sure that the mandates of the nhs commission board has at its heart quality nursing, or day care, and the voice of patients. we also need to look at how health watch is going to work to make sure it is tru
today calling for change. he wants republicans to focus more on issues like education and health care and spend less time talking about the deficit. congressman cantor is with us this morning. >> good morning. >> you've got a big speech today asking the republican party to change. is this about tone or ideology? >> what this is about is about making sure that we can express why we're doing what we're doing. we believe very strongly obviously in things like fiscal discipline and not spending money you don't have we also believe in that, because it helps people, in the same way we've got to address the plight of so many working americans right now, and those who don't have any work and say that yes, we've got policies that will help you in terms of giving you an opportunity for quality education, in terms of trying to help you bring down the costs of health care. we've got some real policies that we want to put to work to help people and that's what this is about. >> so on policy and on immigration reform will you today endorse the proposal put forward by senator
that his dream and his words and the education that we have from dr. king stays alive for generations to come. so, this is truly an amazing event today. dr. king in 1967 asked, where do we go from here? and today we're still asking that same question. where do we go from here? well, we still have people suffering in our community, people in the african-american community. where do we go from here when we have lost numbers of african americans in san francisco? where do we go from here? well, i'll tell you where we go from here. (applause) >> we change policy of the city. we change policy, and we start to be progressive, truly progressive about the policies we push to make african americans feel welcomed in this city. so, where do we go from here? we start to make aggressive efforts to educate our young people. we take ownership of our community. we take ownership of our children. we support each other instead of pointing the finger. where do we go from here? (applause) >> there is much work to do. as supervisor cohen and i cannot do it alone, we need your support. we need your encoura
or the schools? educate is not schooling. schooling is the institutional matrix, institutional matrix that receives the urge to learn and then distribute it, distributes it culturally. ostensibly based on merit but learn something for a life-style. that's what you do when you figure out your life situation and figure out what to do in regard to how you continue to learn and flute ture and grow your mind over the space of a lifetime. so the point is that we got these institutions that are making judgements about our children and that we are complicit in without stepping up to the plate to intervene. and so i'm so glad you all are doing that with knowledge, with insight, with savvy and also with critical acumen give to you over a lifetime. we need to use this in behalf of our children so that they won't be sent off. because one person gets hit on the back of the hand and told not to do it anymore. drunk until a certain age. then can go on to be president. another person gets consigned to being a janitor. both got the same talent. both got the same, if barack obama had been caught doing
budget which means it takes money away from other areas like education infrastructure and other health service needs. medicaid and the need to have flexibility is going to be certainly something we will watch as we go forward. let me finish by ending where i started. we need to address the rising cost of health health health ca. i don't think the affordable care act does that. i think we have provided an opportunity with their health care exchange and utah that allows businesses to contain to provide benefits and help with competitive forces and consumer control to in fact have an impact on the rising cost of health care. it may be imperfect but it's a step i think in the right direction. again the fundamental position that i'm taking and we are taking in utah is the free market works if we will allow it. it takes politicians like himself and others out there to be disciplined and to give time for the marketplace to work. we sometimes are so i just a problem that we don't look at making adjustments that are necessary to get the right outcome. and as i said, if we want the best quality
, education, and taxes. this is 45 minutes. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. i am the president of the american enterprise institute and i am pleased to welcome eric cantor today. it is an important policy speech entitled making life work. now, an ordinary introduction of his political career and rise to majority leader and talk about his new legislative accomplishment, his career, as most of you know, is not a collection of accomplishment, but a long-term effort to make it better, or country for all americans. here is someone who pauses to remember the why of public policy, valuing justice for all, protecting the vulnerable, and fighting against class divisions in american life. he knows that it leads to a happy and more prosperous life for more people. he cares about those who are being left behind, people that are looking for work and cannot find it. people who raised barriers of starting business and building another life. eric cantor knows that policy analysis as an american or someone who wants to become an american, is very important. here is the reason that i admire him
of the baby boom generation. and we have a 12 from kindergarten education system. it is not too late. we have about that kind of timeframe in order to start moving. if we don't move soon, it becomes almost impossible to fix this without upheaval. i happen to actually be fairly optimistic. i do think two things. i think the american sense of life, americans fundamentally don't like big government. when times seem to be moving the wrong direction, sometimes we are surprised. i think this is a nice caviar. the biggest thing that we have going for us is that we have the best ideas. the bad news is that things have railed over and over again. people tell me how surprised they were when the soviet union failed. but communism always fails. it did not surprise me at all. the question is when it does, will we be there with the right ideas to move the country in the right direction. even though i think we will win because we have the right ideas. in regards to individual objects, i think we had problems economically and problems in deviations of politics. the company did great and never had a single qu
that education and training cannot overcome intense market incentives. a vocal, point for payment reform has been mentioned. aha a committee is a secretive group of doctors that wields tremendous influence over medicare reimbursement rates. the cms and adopts nearly all of their recommendations. at a minimum, the public deserves transparency. but yet, we should establish rates of thing that is not favoring narrow specialties. the federal government and ama are colluding to bring an end to the primary care physician work force in the united states. in summary, it is clear that health insurance provides better health outcomes, including a decrease risk for death. despite this, we will leave 30 million uninsured. i have worked for over a decade in medical education as a student, resident, fellow, and a faculty member and program later. it is my conviction that public responsive training should meet the health care needs of our population, and rather than the staffing needs of hospitals or the lifestyle preferences of young doctors. >> my understanding is that senator franken has to leave, and you wa
, their actual true core, it was just as a pencil sketch. education opens up doors, that's really what we try to focus on. we don't try and tell people "here is what you have to go do and here is the path ahead that you have to take." but, it's much more about creating a sense of possibility and allowing each child to dictate their own path. we build schools and increase access to education for children around the world and we have now broken ground on over a hundred schools in africa, asia and latin america. if you think about the way that the world was 50 years ago and you think about how the world is going to look 50 years from now, i cannot imagine that every single child thats born doesn't have some opportunity to have access to quality education. the schools that we build and will continue to build will be a very important piece to that puzzle, but it's innovation through technology that's going to be able to reach the masses in ways that we have never been able to do so before. and so a big part of pencils of promise going forward is going to be investment in education technology for t
from president clinton is this public leadership, this education function? >> i really agree with that and i think that people used -- people in your business really used to complain about the president's length of his state of the unions. but really he thought of that as a time where i can really lay this out, i can slain to people what i'm trying to achieve, i can reup my contract with the american people about what's positive, his job approval as i said always went up when he did that. but i think that really is a critical element of what a president needs to do in the second term. the other thing he needs to do is use the full force of his executive power. when it comes to moving on clean energy and climate change, when it comes to implementing health care, when it comes to many of the president's other priorities, he's not going to get a lot of help from the republicans on capitol hill, but he can achieve success through the deft use now in the process of building out his second term cabinet, more use of the cabinet to try to get those things done. i think it will be cri
. without too many houses, houses never face. we should've invested in technology, manufacturing, education. we should've spent less and save more. we should've borrowed this from foreigners. the important thing people don't get, housing this consumption because people individually think they invested in the house. we can assume a house like another mobile. what they're really doing is over consuming. we had a massive overconsumption. it's analogous to eating the seed corn as analogous. protect millions of people headed to the the wrong thing. we talked and honda both houses to the mortgage bankers, presidential legal attorney. those millions of people try to learn how to do something it's productive in a global economy. in addition, construction which is their competitive. you try that manufacturing wages, which we did with this artificial construction boom in miniature of millions of manufacturing jobs overseas to places they can have china and initially people in india and china didn't know how to do the work while. for having a really difficult time getting those jobs back. they make a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 740 (some duplicates have been removed)